Computer Keyboard with a Built in Fan?

I was very frustrated at work today. I’m not sure if it’s hotter in my office or if I’m just stressed, but my hands have been constantly sweating. The sweating was really irritating me as I typed on my computer keyboard.

I decided to do a Google search to try to find a computer keyboard with a fan positioned at the hands. I have a fan on my desk now, but it doesn’t help much because the airflow is not able to reach my hands.

What I found was a gamer keyboard. What an ingenious invention!

Gamers’ hands get sweaty, and they may not even have HH. The fan is built-in to the upper left hand side of the keyboard and keeps your hands cool as  you type.

I’m not a gamer, but I still want this keyboard! I wish that general keyboards would start offering this fan option. I don’t need all the other fancy “gamer” features.

Check the keyboard out HERE.

                                             

New Coping Tip

Hi All,

You all have heard how nervous I get about shaking people’s hands because of my HH. Going to an interview is especially nerve-wracking. You don’t want to give a bad first impression, and you hope your interviewer looks past your sweaty hands. Unfortunately, sweaty hands can give the impression that you are more nervous than you really are. I wish it weren’t true, but a sweaty handshake could be what is standing between you and that job.

Recently, I have been on the other side of the coin. I have been interviewing 3 or 4 people each week for the past two weeks for an open position in my office.  It’s been a really interesting experience so far. I have never been an interviewer before. I have learned what it really takes for a resume to stand out, and the reality of the interview and application process.

I’m happy to have this responsibility, and I am up for the challenge…

but think of all the hands I’m shaking!

I shouldn’t be the nervous one, yet shaking hands makes me nervous no matter what.

If my hands aren’t wet, they are freezing cold.

I really didn’t want my handshake to leave a bad first impression with the interviewees, so I tried something new:

I washed my hands right before I was about to meet them.

By washing my hands, my hand temperature was regulated and the sweating wasn’t as bad after wiping my hands dry.

I recommend trying this out, and let me know what your results are! This is a great new coping tip for me, and I hope it helps you too!

Best,

Caryn

New Quality of Life Survey

If you have Hyperhidrosis, check out this new Quality of Life survey: http://www.hidroqol.org/

It’s different from the previous survey because it focuses on our experience with the condition over a longer period of time (21 days).

The survey doesn’t take very long, and there will be only 3 surveys in total. After completing the initial survey, you will receive a survey after 8 days and then again after 21 days.

Please take this survey if you suffer from HH! Results from this study will help improve the diagnosis of HH and ultimately contribute to improving our quality of life.

Best,

Caryn

 

 

Sweat and Chicken Wings

Hi All,

I recently received a question from a reader about how HH impacts my dating life.

Well, from my previous entries, you all know I’ve been in a long term relationship for a while.

My boyfriend’s name is Francis and we have been together for 4 years. We were long distance for a while, but now we are happily in the same city- New York City!

Although my boyfriend and I are now very comfortable with each other, my HH still plays a big part in our relationship. Just the other night, I asked him again (for the umpteenth time): “Are you sure my hands don’t bother you?  “It’s not gross when I touch you?”

Thankfully, Francis has always been fine with my HH. I am lucky to have found him!

Other than the physical aspect of HH, he understands when I get very frustrated and emotional due to HH limitations. I try to be calm, but sometimes I can’t help it. He talks me through it or gives me a hug.

Francis is also very supportive about my goal to help others like me with HH. He encourages me to blog and to talk to people. It feels really good to trust that Francis isn’t grossed out by my HH and he is someone I confide in all the time.

We don’t let HH limit our relationship. We go out, stay in, watch movies, go to dinner…we are a pretty normal couple. If we’re talking about HH, it’s usually about ideas for my blog or ideas for future non-profit organizations for people with HH. We don’t like to let HH bring us down, although it’s okay to feel sad sometimes.

My advice to you is: Don’t settle. There is a guy or girl out there who will be accepting of your HH and you deserve to have that person.

And you never know- that person may just have HH themselves. Or a version of it.

I will go out on a limb and say that Francis has secondary HH. Secondary Hyperhidrosis is different from mine (primary) because it is caused by something. For example: taking certain medications, being overweight and/or having other medical conditions can cause overactive sweating. Francis’ cause happens to be spicy food.

The first time I noticed the sweating was when we ate chicken wings together at a dining hall on our college campus. His forehead had broken out in a sweat and had started dripping. The back of his shirt was starting to get wet.

I felt more comfortable mentioning the sweating because of my own condition, and Francis told me that it always happened to him when he ate spicy food.

Since then, this has been a normal and frequent occurrence. We both really like Thai food, and sometimes it can get spicy. He will sweat right there in the restaurant, and sweat way more than me! His forehead will sometimes get really sweaty and he has to go through a bunch of napkins to mop it up.

I have never had a problem with spicy foods and sweating, so I don’t really understand that aspect of overactive sweating. However, I know that Francis has a much better idea of my HH through these experiences.

I recently asked him if he made social decisions based on his spicy food sweating episodes. He said that he probably wouldn’t eat anything really spicy out in public, but it doesn’t bother him too much if he sweats just a little bit since he really likes spicy food.This is similar to people who suffer from primary HH because we make social decisions based on our HH all the time.

Francis did not know what HH was before he met me. I didn’t know he had sweating tendencies when eating spicy food. Since we started dating, I have slowly taught him what it means to live with HH. I know he still learns new ways I am limited by the condition, but he has a much better sense of what my life has been like.

If it’s any reassurance for the future, I notice that my sweating has decreased when around Francis because I am now more comfortable and relaxed around him. Dating always made me nervous, and nerves will create more sweat.

Don’t hide your HH. If it comes up, talk about it. HH is a big part of your life and a big part of who you are, whether you like it or not. The right person for you is going to love you for everything you are.

All my best,

Caryn

Crocs

Unfortunately, many of my shoes suffer a premature death. Especially my ballet flats that I sometimes wear with no socks.

This is because of my Hyperhidrosis.

HH will ruin the insoles of a shoe pretty quick. I had 2 pairs of Steve Madden flats that ruined within one summer. The metallic inside rubbed completely off.

HH will also make your shoes smell. I try odor-eater insoles but it doesn’t help much. Usually those insoles ruin even quicker than the shoes.

Having HH and wearing no socks will also probably impact your walking pattern.
I know that I walk differently when I’m slipping and sliding in my shoes. This altered step can ruin the whole make of the shoe, inside and out.

So, I’m in Disney World on vacation a few weeks ago and I saw a woman wearing some shoes that looked cute, comfortable and….plastic?

Okay, so they’re Crocs. And after researching them, I learned that their Croslite material doesn’t absorb water! Check this Youtube video below!

How perfect for me! I bought a pair of “Kadee” Crocs and I’m giving them a try. They are really comfortable and so far doing great with my HH.

If you buy online, sign up for a new account. You will receive a welcome coupon and save money on your first purchase! There’s also free shipping!

I know that the Crocs name has gotten some laughs, but I think the new styles are really nice. If you have HH especially, I think it’s worth a try.

Here are the ones that I got: Kadee Croc. 

Happy New Year!

Caryn

Blushing and Blotching

I am having a problem with the overactive blushing symptom of HH recently. I’ve been given a lot more responsibility at work, and maybe I’ve just been more nervous and anxious than usual, but my neck and chest are blotching up like crazy!

It’s so frustrating and embarrassing. I see coworkers looking at it, and one has even made a comment. I try to explain that it’s part of my condition, but I don’t go much into detail.

All I can do is be strong, and look them in the eye. I try to ignore it. This takes a lot of will power, as you know.

When people with HH blotch up, we can feel it. At least with me, there is heat on the skin of my chest and I know immediately that I am having a blushing problem.

I want to tell everyone that I can’t help it and that I’m sensitive about it.

Other ways you can  cope with overacting blushing are:

1. wear scarves
2. wear large necklaces to cover it up
3. keep your chin down so the neck isn’t fully exposed
4. in a meeting, hold your notepad in front of your chest
5. or- let your blotching continue to the point where your entire chest and neck area are all the same color red. I almost prefer this to the inconsistent blotching. I think it is less noticeable.

These tips may sound silly and probably aren’t fully effective. But, these are my personal coping mechanisms that make me feel a little better about it.

At any rate, remember to breathe and drink water.

I had a meeting today where blotching and blushing was a real problem. I ended up with a terrible headache from the anxiety I put myself through. Yet, no one said a thing.

All my best to you out there…welcoming the cooler weather!

Caryn

 

(I know it) Like the back of my hand

I use the back of my hands a lot. You might find this strange or confusing, but it’s another coping mechanism.

The back of my hands sweat less. The tops of my fingers will sweat occasionally when my HH is very strong and opposite the palm area (above the wrist and below the knuckles), there is no sweat.

For my job, I have to hang a lot of posters to advertise concerts. I always smooth them down with the backs of my hands. I can’t do it with the front of my sweaty hands or the ink will run!

On the subway, I will sometimes balance myself by pressing the back of my hand to the rail. This works for the most part. I’m really good at balancing.

Side note- I truly think I have better balance from having HH on my feet. Walking with sweaty feet in sandals requires a lot of balance!

If I ever really need to be in close proximity to people where my hands may brush them, I make sure it’s with the back of my hands.  Fist bump instead of hand shake?

I tend to keep my palms down, so people are only seeing the back (tops) of my hands. Less glistening in the light!

At a bar, I will hold onto my drink most of the night so only the back of my hands are showing. Also, if you need to shake someone’s hand unexpectedly, you can claim that the sweat is the condensation from your glass. I do this a lot, actually. More lying- I guess this should have been in my “lying” post.

Does anyone else with HH use the back of their hands?

Caryn

Oh yeah, I’m a flute player

So, I have been noticing that I rarely write anything about my flute playing in here.

Let me tell you a quick story.

I am in a woodwind quintet that performs all over the city.
In March 2012, we auditioned for MUNY (Music Under New York).
MUNY participants are able to reserve the best tip spots to perform in the subways.
Well, we won the audition!

We started playing in the subways this summer.

The evening before our first performance (which was in Union Square), I realized something I should have thought about a long time ago.

The subways are HOT. I have complained about the heat in my posts before, and other readers have commented on their heat as well. I have had some of my worst HH moments in subways!

I started freaking out- What did I do!?! Why did I intentionally do this to myself?!?
I was so upset with myself for not thinking this through.

The next day, we all played, and boy was it hot! But we all survived.

I brought a very absorbent towel with me, and that worked well. I keep that towel in my flute bag now, and use it every time I play. I use my music to fan my hands if necessary, and wipe my hands on my jeans.

My quintet and I have since then performed in Grand Central, Penn Station, Herald Square, and Columbus Circle. Each has been successful, and I am able to play my flute okay.

This past weekend in Columbus Circle, I became paranoid because people were looking over my shoulder (probably at the music) and my hands were dripping sweat. I hope they didn’t notice!

Also, my hands made the pads under my keys all sticky and moist. This gives an annoying sound when you move the keys. I hate feeling like I’m breaking my instrument every time I play 😦

For more info on my flute playing- www.carynfreitag.com

Stay strong out there- anything is possible, with a few alterations.

Caryn

What Would You Like to Read About?

Hi All,

I want to write about things that you want to read. Please fill out this poll to let me know what you’re interested in. I have included a few options, but please, if you have suggestions about a topic, write it in the “other” box.


Thank you for reading 🙂

The weather is cooling off, so I hope you are all doing well!
Caryn

Don’t Sweat It…

As a person with Hyperhidrosis, I have constantly been paranoid about where I put my hands, always wondering if people will see the sweat on my palms and fingers. When I’m playing my flute and my hands are probably gleaming  in the light, I start panicking and my performance is hindered.

Yesterday, I was at a meeting for work. I was at a conference table, taking notes with pen and paper. My hands were very sweaty and I was getting all nervous and uncomfortable.

YET, no one noticed at all. No one was looking at me strange, no one was looking at my hands.

Maybe they weren’t being observant or aware.

Think about it- how often do you look at people’s hands? I have HH and I don’t look at hands often, unless I am specifically looking out for people with the condition. I feel people look at hands and take them for granted- they don’t look to see an abnormality.

I really think this is how people with HH have lived in secret for so long.

This is something I need to tell myself now:

“Keep playing your flute- chances are they aren’t even looking at the sweat. They are listening to your music. ”

Don’t get me wrong- I think I will still be paranoid about what I do with my hands…I think it is a feeling that people with HH have all the time- the need to hide and conceal.

But, I just wanted to put my two cents in and let you know that there is a chance that people might not notice.

How many times has someone actually made a comment about your sweating? Not many people have actually commented on my sweating before I told them about my condition. Maybe we need to concentrate on this.

On the other hand, this could also mean that I’m just really good at hiding it! 🙂

Best,

Caryn