Entire Medical Journal dedicated to HH

Last week, I received an email from the International Hyperhidrosis Society stating that an entire issue of the Dermatologic Clinics medical journal was dedicated completely to Hyperhidrosis! This is ground-breaking news and I wanted to learn more. The issue is found in October 2014, Volume 32, Number 4. It covers topics such as:

  • Prevalence of HH
  • Impact of HH on Quality of Life
  • Special Considerations for Children with HH
  • Topical Therapies
  • Iontophoresis
  • Botox treatments
  • Oral medications
  • ETS surgery
  • Emerging therapies
  • Resources for patients and sufferers
  • Incorporating diagnosis and treatment into Clinical Practice

You can purchase the entire issue or individual articles. This is a really exciting breakthrough for people with HH. The issue will be available to medical specialists and provide education on our condition and the latest treatments available! Just another big step in the right direction for universal awareness and understanding.

Hyperhidrosis Genetics Study

This past year, I participated in a study conducted by the Albert Einstein College of Medicine on the genetics of Hyperhidrosis.

In today’s e-newsletter from the International Hyperhidrosis Society, I learned of some findings from the study. You can read the article HERE.

If you are living with HH, I encourage you to contact the College of Medicine and participate.

My experience with them was very positive. I was mailed a free kit that included a HH questionnaire and supplies for DNA samples (mouthwash samples).

After the questionnaire was complete and mouthwash samples were collected, I mailed the kit back to the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, free of charge.

It is important for your family members to also participate in the study whether they have HH or not because genetics and heredity are being tested.

Thanks for reading,

Caryn

 

What do you say?

Hey All!

I’ve had a great time responding to all your comments from the article, and it’s time to get back to posting! Thanks for your patience!

For some time now, I’ve wanted to write about my palmar HH and what I say or think  about my hands when they are extra sweaty.

Palmar HH is really difficult.
If my hands are extra sweaty and I’m in a meeting, I literally can’t take notes. I can’t even move.

The other day I was in an awfully stressful meeting. I literally sweated through half a notebook- just by holding it.

If the sweat wasn’t enough, I was also super self conscious about my neck and chest blotching and was trying so hard to cover it up.

Other examples of Palmar HH struggles:
If I’m on a hot platform waiting for the subway, I can’t read a paperback book or a newspaper- I can’t even hold it! (Recently switched to Kindle and loving it)
Also, just last night, I was trying to answer emails on my Mac and my sweat was interfering with the trackpad! Can’t catch a break.

Palmar HH is so annoying!

Here are a few things I say about my hands:

My hands are…

1. melting
2. not working right now
3. broken
4. bad
5. a mess
6. not behaving

I’m sure I missed a few.
What do you say about your palmar HH?
Please leave me comments!

Thanks for reading,
Caryn

Thank you!

Hi All,

I wanted to thank you for reading the article posted by the International Hyperhidrosis Society this week! This article has been a very positive experience for me and I feel like it connected the HH community even more!

Thank you for your emails, comments and supportive words. Reading through all of your messages has been very powerful and emotional.

I identify with you all your stories and am just like you- trying to live as “normal” of a life as I can with HH.

Please continue to be strong and have the courage to tell someone new about your HH today. We can all get through this together.

I hope you all enjoy your weekend and stay cool! 🙂

Best,

Caryn

I was featured by the International Hyperhidrosis Society!

I wanted to share some exciting news!

Today I was featured in an article in the International Hyperhidrosis Society eNewsletter! Sharing my HH story with others has been a really rewarding experience and I thank the International Hyperhidrosis Society for giving me the opportunity to share with so many of you!

Please click HERE to read the article.

The International Hyperhidrosis Society is a fantastic support site for people with Hyperhidrosis. They share a wealth of information including HH education, tips for coping, stories from others with HH, deals and discounts on sweat-helping products, research studies, treatment information, a comprehensive search for doctors, ways to get involved and more! I have had a really positive experience communicating with them in preparation for this article and always find their website helpful. Please check it out!

All best, and stay tuned for an entry about the Iontophoresis machine that was just donated to me from R.A. Fischer iontophoresis devices !

Caryn

 

Riverdance anyone?

About 5 weeks ago, I started taking Irish Step dance lessons.
I used to dance (tap and jazz) and I have always loved “rhythmic” dance.
Anything with a tap on the shoe to make percussive noise, I’m there.
Maybe it’s the musician in me.

I’ve always been interested in Irish Step, especially hard shoe.
Right now, since I’m a very beginner, I’m starting with soft shoe.
This means, there aren’t any percussive sounds.
The shoe is a soft leather with no taps on the bottom.

Anyway, I was so excited for my first class!
I hadn’t taken dance in years, and was happy to start again.

As soon as I got there, panic hit me.
Have you ever seen Riverdance?
All of those dancers hold hands…like the whole time!
Why didn’t I think of this??

I’m ready to bolt, but wait and give it a try.

Thank goodness, this class is different!
It’s more “solo” Irish Step.
There are other people in the class, but we just keep our hands down at our sides.
Haven’t had to hold a hand yet!

This experience brings up an issue that many HH sufferers stress about.
Have you ever wanted to do something but didn’t because hand holding may be involved?

I used to be a gymnast.
Okay, I was 5.
But I could pull off a mean cart-wheel!

Recently, around the time of the last Olympics, I read the results of a HH survey asking:

“What would be the worst Olympic sport for people with HH, what would be the best?”

Overwhelmingly, the results were:
Worst: GYMNASTICS | Best: SWIMMING

Can you imagine gymnastics with HH?
The uneven bars? The balance beam?

I don’t believe I quit gymnastics because of my HH.
I think I was just being a kid and didn’t want to do it anymore.

Sometimes, I wish I would have continued.
But I cannot imagine I would have any success due to HH.

I love dancing, but I would never take ballroom or salsa.
I used to want to clog dance.
My sister took it and I really enjoyed watching her.
But I wouldn’t ever dance ballroom/salsa/clogging because there is hand holding involved with some steps.
Why would I voluntarily put myself in that position?

Happy Reading,
Caryn

Hand Holding in Schools

I’ve had a goal recently to start working with children and HH. I want to go into the schools and educate teachers, nurses, parents and students about HH.

One goal is to adjust lesson plans to remove activities that require hand games or holding hands with other students. This could include activities in gym class such as dancing or certain types of tag, classroom games of getting to know each other, and/or holding hands with a buddy when walking down the hall.

I remember as a child going through Elementary school especially, other students didn’t want to hold my hands because they were wet. At my young age, I still didn’t know what was going on with me. I didn’t know I was different from other kids. It was confusing and hurtful when people would call me gross.

I feel that as an alternative, schools could start by making these activities optional and the buddy system could be altered by using a rope to hold on to, instead of someone’s hand.

Ideally, by educating about HH in the schools, teachers will know what to look for in HH sufferers and be able to address the condition with the student and parents. If teachers find a student with HH in their class, their lesson plans could be altered accordingly and special attention could be given to the child. For example, I know that I struggled a lot writing with pencil and paper in class or working on art projects. The teacher would be able to offer the student additional time to complete projects, and offer alternatives such as: going to a separate room to take tests, give the child a paper towel or cloth, let the student write with pen, etc.

Recently, I spoke with a friend of mine who is currently earning her music education degree. She wants to be a music teacher in public schools.

When I spoke to her about my idea to remove hand holding from schools, she disagreed. If I understood her correctly, her theory is that children need hand holding to feel safe and connected to others. Also, if someone in the class had HH, it is the teacher’s responsibility to let the other children know that the condition is not a big deal, and that holding the person’s hand is okay.

I see where she is coming from, but I just cringe when thinking back to when I was a kid. It was really painful to feel different and gross.

What do you all think?