November is Hyperhidrosis Awareness Month

I live with Hyperhidrosis in a private way. It is my secret life. My palmar and plantar Hyperhidrosis can be invisible to others. I’ve also become so good at hiding it that there’s a chance that the people I interact with on a daily basis might never even know I have this condition.

I have lived with Hyperhidrosis for 31 years. I am used to this life. But sometimes it doesn’t seem to get any easier. As I sit and write this, I am fanning my hands and soaking the sweat up with paper towels. I am trying to breathe through my discomfort. I am alone in my room, not anxious or nervous about anything, and I’m still struggling just being me.

One of my most successful coping techniques for Hyperhidrosis has been writing about my experiences on this blog. It has helped tremendously getting my thoughts and frustrations out about living with this condition. Another way I cope with Hyperhidrosis, is to tell people in my life about it.

November is Hyperhidrosis Awareness month. It is our second annual month and I am so thankful that this condition has reached the point to have an official month. It is a very big accomplishment in the world of Hyperhidrosis and it’s an exciting time to be a part of it.

I encourage us all living with Hyperhidrosis to get out there and tell someone about this condition and what it means to have it. Not only will telling someone about Hyperhidrosis spread awareness and understanding, it could give you the relief and support you need. For me, telling certain people about my Hyperhidrosis has made my quality of life better.

One really impactful example I have for you happened just last week.

For some backstory, a few years ago, I decided to start mentioning my Hyperhidrosis in my job interviews. I was at the point in my life when I was starting to switch careers and go into Special Education. Hyperhidrosis was my biggest inspiration for my decision, and as scary as it was to talk about, I found it fitting to explain why my life experience has led me to this point.

So, my current boss has known about my Hyperhidrosis since the first day I met her. Since starting this job a year and a half ago, little by little, I explained what living with this condition means to me. I’m thankful I told her about my condition right away because it allowed me to be myself.

I work from home now, which has been a huge help in managing my own room temperature and always having a fan at the ready. But this fall, I have been traveling to the office more frequently. Last week while I was in the office, I was part of a group meeting. The room was very warm and I knew immediately that I was going to have an issue with my hands sweating. I had a paper towel with me, but I was worried it was not going to be enough. At any other job, I would have just dealt with it and melted away, not being able to focus on the meeting at all. I’ve had those meetings where all I could concentrate on was my sweat and how uncomfortable I was – and how nervous I was for my secret to be discovered.

My boss was part of this meeting and I asked if I could bring a fan in to help with my Hyperhidrosis. She didn’t question or give it a second thought. I brought the fan in and positioned it at my hands. I don’t think that anyone else in the meeting thought it was weird or different. It may seem small, but this fan helped my hands stop sweating and allowed me to focus on the meeting. It made me feel normal.

It’s funny how something so small like this can be so impactful to me. I think of it and smile even now. One person who knew about my Hyperhidrosis made me feel comfortable enough to bring in an accommodation for myself – something I knew would help me. Telling people about my Hyperhidrosis has made my life better.

That is just one example of how Hyperhidrosis awareness has helped me personally. I believe that Hyperhidrosis awareness and understanding will make the world a better place for us. We are all in this together. This month, I encourage you to tell someone about your Hyperhidrosis journey. Be strong and have courage. I know you can do it. I can’t wait to hear your stories!

Happy Hyperhidrosis Awareness Month,

Caryn

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Share your HH stories on a brand new site!

Hi all,

I’m excited to promote this amazing new website project from one of my readers, Matthew Roundell. His website is a story telling platform for the Hyperhidrosis community. The site is still in the works as Matthew is trying to compile more stories from people like you!

I submitted my story and I can’t wait to read yours!

Check it out and submit your story today at www.hyperhidrosee.com

A big thank you goes to Matthew for continuing to connect the HH community!

All the best,

Caryn

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Facial and Truncal Hyperhidrosis?

After successfully treating my Axillary (underarm) Hyperhidrosis in middle school, I have only categorized my Hyperhidrosis as palmar (hands) and plantar (feet). On any average day, I don’t have trouble with facial or truncal sweating. However, when I’m exercising, I am a complete, full-body waterworks!

At my Irish step dance classes, I have been noticing that I sweat all over my body- at least 3 times more than the other students! I can only wear sweat wicking workout clothes now and I use my towel almost constantly during the class to “mop” up. My ponytail is soaked so much with sweat that it drips and it feels like there’s a quarter-inch of sweat caked on my legs and arms.

My classmates notice and always suggest I stand closer to the fan or air-conditioning unit. I don’t think they think much of it, but it’s embarrassing sometimes. It’s also uncomfortable!

Although I don’t consider myself having truncal or facial Hyperhidrosis, I think that my palmar and plantar Hyperhidrosis genes definitely play a role in how I sweat more on my body when working out. Has anyone else noticed this happens to them?

A Safe, New Treatment for Excessive Sweating

Hyperhidrosis isn’t easy, but let’s face it, neither are the common treatments. If you decide to use a heavy duty antiperspirant you have to apply it often. If you choose Botox®, you need to pay for a new treatment every 3 to 6 months. Then, if you decide to go a more permanent route like thermal liposuction, you run the risk of burning and damaging your skin, glands, or deeper tissues. There has to be another way doesn’t there? There is.

A pioneering new liposuction technique has been growing in popularity, and one of its uses is not for liposuction, but rather for hyperhidrosis. The procedure known as SAFELipo® has been recognized for exactly what its name implies: a safer alternative. When it comes to treating excessive sweating, it is also a safer method than some of the alternative permanent treatments, like thermal liposuction. This is because it doesn’t run the risk of burning your body.

So, how exactly does SAFELipo work? Basically, it treats hyperhidrosis by disrupting the apocrine glands in the armpits. The apocrine glands are the sweat and odor producing glands in the body.

Who is a candidate for SAFELipo? The procedure focuses on the patient’s armpit and breast areas, making it ideal for people with underarm (axillary) hyperhidrosis.

What sets SAFELipo apart from other treatments? The SAFELipo website explains that, “Thermal liposuction and Botox injections, two of the most commonly employed hyperhidrosis treatments, both have their drawbacks. Lipo can be effective, but thermal methods such as laser and smart liposuction can destroy vital tissues. Botox, while safer, only deactivates the sweat glands temporarily. SAFELipo offers the best of both worlds: permanent disruption and deactivation of the sweat glands without the risk of thermal injury.”

If you suffer from hyperhidrosis and want to learn more about whether SAFELipo can work for you, you’ll need to find a doctor that is qualified to perform the procedure. The easiest way is to utilize the “Find a Doctor” feature on the SAFELipo website. From here, you can easily select your location and browse providers in your state.

Hyperhidrosis is tough to live with, but luckily there are treatments such as SAFELipo that offer permanent solutions so we can live without it.

–guest post written by Mike Davis